Uranus

Uranus is the seventh planet from the Sun. Its name is a reference to the Greek god of the sky, Uranus, who, according to Greek mythology, was the great-grandfather of Ares, grandfather of Zeus and father of Cronus. It has the third-largest planetary radius and fourth-largest planetary mass in the Solar System. Uranus is similar in composition to Neptune, and both have bulk chemical compositions which differ from that of the larger gas giants Jupiter and Saturn. For this reason, scientists often classify Uranus and Neptune as "ice giants" to distinguish them from the other giant planets. As with gas giants, ice giants also lack a well defined "solid surface." Uranus's atmosphere is similar to Jupiter's and Saturn's in its primary composition of hydrogen and helium, but it contains more "ices" such as water, ammonia, and methane, along with traces of other hydrocarbons.

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Watch the moon eclipse Uranus tonight

The moon will eclipse Uranus Saturday (Jan. 28)

Like at the Center of Planet Uranus: How Materials Behave Under Extreme Pressure

Scientists Investigate Potential Regolith Origin on Uranus’ Moon, Miranda

Watch the moon pass in front of Uranus today (Dec. 5)

Asking the Public to Name Probe to Uranus May Have Been a Mistake

Spot Uranus at opposition in the night sky Wednesday (Nov. 9)

See the moon cozy up to Uranus tonight (Nov. 8)

Blood Moon 2022: Why You Might See ‘Shooting Stars’ And Uranus During Next Week’s Total Lunar Eclipse

Plans for a NASA orbiter mission to Uranus' moons beckon

Uranus moons beckon to plans for a NASA orbiter mission to the sideways world

Uranus moons beckon to plans for a NASA orbiter mission to the sideways world

Astronomers have a new theory for why Uranus spins on its side: The ice giant once had a large moon that migrated outward, which slowly flipped Uranus sideways.

Mysterious dust ring around Uranus spotted in rediscovered Voyager 2 data

Watch the moon pass in front of Uranus early Wednesday (Oct. 12)

A Migrating Moon Might Have Turned Uranus Over on its Side

Uranus' weird tilt may be caused by a long-lost moon

Uranus' weird tilt may be the work of a long-lost moon

Uranus' weird tilt may be the work of a long-lost moon

Astronomers Think They Know The Reason For Uranus's Kooky Off-Kilter Axis