Ultrasound

The Gravis UltraSound or GUS is a sound card for the IBM PC compatible system platform, made by Canada-based Advanced Gravis Computer Technology Ltd.

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Treating chronic pain with ultrasound – The device at the center of these human clinical trials, called Diadem, promises to change how certain neurological disorders are treated. Resembling a pair of oversized headphones, it stimulates regions of the deep brain underlying chronic pain and depression

Innovative Cancer Treatment Uses Ultrasound-Activated Drugs for Targeting

Ultrasound Can Probe Deep Into The Brain to Relieve Pain

Ultrasound could spot battery defects that might lead to fires

Ultrasound Enables Remote 3-D Printing--Even in the Human Body

Ultrasound can push vaccines into the body without needles

Ultrasound – A New Way To Get Rid of Toxic “Forever Chemicals”

Ultrasound may rid groundwater of toxic 'forever chemicals'

Breakthrough treatment for skin infection: Novel microneedle array embedded with ultrasound-triggered antibacterial nanoparticles

Researchers use ultrasound to control orientation of small particles

Bubble Wonder – Researchers Develop New Mathematical Model to Enhance Ultrasound Resolution

How ultrasound therapy could treat everything from ageing to cancer

Ultrasound Puts Animals into a Curious Hibernation-Like State

Ultrasound breaks new ground for forearm fractures in children

Researchers made the first wireless wearable ultrasound device that images tissue below the skin while patients move freely. The system could allow monitoring of blood pressure, heart health, and lung capacity in real time during daily activities, including physical exertion.

Ultrasound Induces Torpor-Like State in Animals, Experiment Shows

Scientists Induce Hibernation-Like State Using Ultrasound Stimulation of the Brain

Engineers Develop the First Fully Integrated Wearable Ultrasound System for Deep-Tissue Monitoring

Induction of a torpor-like state with ultrasound

Ultrasound can trigger a hibernation-like state in mice and rats