Microglia

Microglia are a type of neuroglia located throughout the brain and spinal cord. Microglia account for 10–15% of all cells found within the brain. As the resident macrophage cells, they act as the first and main form of active immune defense in the central nervous system. Microglia are distributed in large non-overlapping regions throughout the CNS. Microglia are key cells in overall brain maintenance—they are constantly scavenging the CNS for plaques, damaged or unnecessary neurons and synapses, and infectious agents. Since these processes must be efficient to prevent potentially fatal damage, microglia are extremely sensitive to even small pathological changes in the CNS. This sensitivity is achieved in part by the presence of unique potassium channels that respond to even small changes in extracellular potassium. Recent evidence shows that microglia are also key players in the sustainment of normal brain functions under healthy conditions.

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Synapse-related genes in microglia are changed by contextual fear conditioning

New study shows microglia cells colonize the human brain in waves

How microglia are prompted to change their state to adapt to different areas of the brain

How microglia contribute to Alzheimer's disease

Early life adversity, microglia dysfunction linked to aberrant adult stress responses, mental illness

Scientists discover gene signature for plaque-eating microglia in Alzheimer's Disease

Gene Signature Discovered for Plaque-Eating Microglia in Alzheimer’s Disease

Scientists discover gene signature for plaque-eating microglia in Alzheimer's Disease

Controlling cholesterol in microglia alleviates chronic pain, opioid-free

Controlling cholesterol in microglia alleviates chronic pain, opioid-free

Microglia, Stockholm syndrome and miraculous cures in glioblastoma patients

Microglia, Stockholm syndrome and miraculous cures in glioblastoma patients