Hippocampus

The hippocampus is a major component of the brain of humans and other vertebrates. Humans and other mammals have two hippocampi, one in each side of the brain. The hippocampus is part of the limbic system, and plays important roles in the consolidation of information from short-term memory to long-term memory, and in spatial memory that enables navigation. The hippocampus is located in the allocortex, with neural projections into the neocortex in humans, as well as primates. The hippocampus, as the medial pallium, is a structure found in all vertebrates. In humans, it contains two main interlocking parts: the hippocampus proper, and the dentate gyrus. In Alzheimer's disease, the hippocampus is one of the first regions of the brain to suffer damage; short-term memory loss and disorientation are included among the early symptoms. Damage to the hippocampus can also result from oxygen starvation, encephalitis, or medial temporal lobe epilepsy.

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Study uncovers distinct time cell populations in the bat hippocampus

Honeycomb maze reveals role of hippocampus in navigation decisions

Joubert Syndrome: Intellectual disability and defects in the hippocampus

Realistic model of mouse hippocampus uncovers new mechanism for pattern separation

Hippocampus is the brain’s storyteller